What Is The Best Opiate For Chronic Pain

Car accidents, as well as any kind of threat to our safety, create after-shocks that are symptoms of PTSD. One reason for this is that the accident is stored in our memory in a specific way. It is stored in episodic memory. That means that, when the accident happens, our survival instinct from way back in history kicks in and we unconsciously notice all kinds of things that our nervous system believes will be important to us to survive such an event in the future.
PTSD in the Making: the Accident
Here’s how it goes, for example: We’re driving along a mountain road. Suddenly, there’s a patch of ice and the car starts sliding into the lane for oncoming traffic. We feel the slide, and start to tense our stomach. Then we see a car coming toward us. Our neck starts to tense. The two cars crash into each other. We hear the sound of screeching tires accompanied by the scorched smell of burning rubber and the crunch of metal. Our hands clench on the wheel, and our whole arms start to clench. Our chest hits the steering wheel.
How an best Accident opiate Creates chronic pain PTSD
Episodic (meaning one time) memory stores, all at once, in a unit, the feel of sliding and accompanying tensing of the stomach; the sight of the what is the best opiate for chronic pain car coming toward us and tensing of the neck; the sound of screeching tires, burning rubber smell and crunching-metal sound along with clenched hands and arms. Adrenaline spurts through the nervous system. Depending on how severe we perceivethe threat to us, we may also go into a trauma reaction of overwhelm, where another chemical, more like an opiate, is released, and blankets over the adrenaline so that we’re spacy, numb, sleepy, or feel separated out from ourselves. This is PTSD trauma.
PTSD Stays in Our Bodies
Now, forever after, unless we find a way to release it, all of the above stays in our bodies and our nervous system. Whenever something happens that has any of the elements above, we automatically go into the same tension and adrenaline and/or opiate reaction that we went into during the original accident. For example, we may flinch and startle when we’re driving on an empty road and suddenly see a car in the other lane; the smell of burning rubber can bring on an adrenaline rush; tires screeching-even when we’re not in a car-may automatically create a tensing of muscles. This is all automatic and immediate. And it may delay the healing of physical injuries as well as emotional pain resulting from the accident.
EFT Heals PTSD
I’ve worked with a number of clients who experience PTSD after car accidents, or other high speed accidents. I use EFT Tapping, which helps the trauma move through and calms the nervous system, alleviating PTSD symptoms.